Arts & Entertainment
 
 
 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Jasmine Kozak Gilroy Capitol Theatre is home to the Olympia Film Society, an eight year old ghost, and, once a year, a vintage horror film marathon known as All Freakin' Night. All Freakin' Night, a mainstay in the Olympia Film Festival since 1989, is a hodgepodge of existentialism and gore, a surreal glimpse into the golden age of horror and the cult fervor that surrounds it. This year I attended the event for the first time. I left home decked in head to toe black- the only attire I deemed appropriate for the occasion- lugging a bag with a water bottle, an extra sweater, and an assortment of candied nuts. A barefoot stranger ran past me and I all but screamed, so I am not sure that I’m say was ready, but I certainly felt prepared. On my way I rewatched the video my friend and I had found of paranormal investigators communicating with the spirit that haunted the theatre, desperately hoping that the young ghost, so talkative...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Amber Hare Walking up a long and narrow flight of stairs, I eventually reached a cramped studio perched above downtown Olympia. The walls are lined with huge boxes filled with canvas scrolls, bags filled with metal coins. A sewing machine hides under a table stacked high with bubble wrap and shipping labels. This is the space where Fall of Magic is being assembled and packaged. Following an extremely successful Kickstarter campaign, Ross Cowman is in the thick of readying over 800 copies of the game to be delivered to early supporters of the project. He invites me to a cafe across the street for a conversation about why story games are so important and how he came to create this incredible storytelling adventure. Hello! Would you like to introduce yourself and the game you’re working on? My name is Ross Cowman, I am a game designer and musician from Olympia. I was born in Seattle in 1979. My parents divorced when I was five, ...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Jules Prosser I went to Hump! Fest for the first time this year. Boy, was I excited! I knew it was going to be weird. I knew it was going to be delightfully uncomfortable. I knew it was going to be a sexy time. Being a fan of all of these, I was counting down the hours until 11 p.m., the second and final showing. On the day of the show, I walked on the bus and sat down on the seat in front of a friend. We discovered that we would both be attending the same screening. I mentioned I was bringing a date, and we discussed the potential repercussions of doing so. The conclusion was, the reaction of your date will probably predict the trajectory of your relationship with them. Everyone should go on a date to Hump! Fest. It’s a fun little experiment, I promise. A little about Hump! for you headscratchers: The first festival was in 2005, in our very own little corner of the world. It was started by alt-newspaper The Stranger a...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Ruby Love Jesse Wiedeman is an illustrator, painter, and printmaker whose incredibly emotive work focuses on the expressive energy of human faces, as it plays with light and shadow in ways reminiscent of graphic novel illustration and film noir. Jesse is a lifelong Washington resident (spending the last 10 years in Auburn) and a sophomore at Evergreen this year. He was drawn to the art program at the college after hearing about a program focusing on graphic novels that he thought was “right up my alley.” Finding himself less than thrilled with the idea of attending other colleges, which seemed to him like “High School 2.0,” Jesse chose Evergreen. Ironically, he says, he didn’t end up taking the graphic novel class that initially piqued his interest in the school, but he still found Evergreen to be a perfect fit. This year, Jesse is taking the program Studio Projects, which runs for the entire year, though he says he’s thi...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By: Ruby Love Evergreen’s 34th annual Harvest Festival was a dizzying array of tours, competitions, showcases, and food-sampling booths, and through all of the buzz and hubbub was interwoven the sounds of a wonderful musical lineup. The stage platforms were fastened together with bright yellow caution tape, balancing unevenly on the hilly grass. Hay bales provided comfy rows of seating in an arc in front of the stage as Olympians gathered to watch the bands, balancing steaming tamales on their laps.  The bands’ equipment was perched on kitchen stools… Is this an Olympia thing? They weren’t just the same two stools…bands brought their own stools. I’m so confused! Evergreen favorite Swoon, featuring a new lineup, kicked off the show with an expectedly charming set full of warmth, youthful giddiness, and just a touch of fall melancholy. A supportive Yasi— one of the band’s founding members and astrology columnist at the Cooper Point ...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Jules Prosser Zine Fest is the first of its kind in Olympia, though the zine scene itself has been thriving for decades. Old and young people alike, from all down the West Coast, gathered at The Olympia Center on Saturday, October 24th to network and sell their crafty wares. This was the second day of the fledgling festival, and the large room was packed with faces familiar and foreign. The space was abuzz: vendors smiled patiently as passersby slowly browsed their way through the expo, people discussed zine content at length, and nearly everyone quietly contemplated these books at some point or another. Upon entering, I was a bit overwhelmed. There was lots to see, lots to rifle through, lots to think about. I slowly walked down the aisles and chatted with vendors with a chattery awkwardness that I hope was endearing. I talked with Courtney K. of Punk in My Vitamins, about the crowdedness of the festival, how she got her st...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Sarah Bradley               On the evening of Wednesday, October 21st, The Olympia Ballroom became the stage for Bread and Puppets presentation of Fire. Bread and Puppets is a politically radical puppet theatre and performance troupe currently based out of Glover, Vermont. Fire was originally created in 1965 as a response and protest of the Vietnam War, and later dedicated to the three Americans who set themselves on fire in an act of protest. Fire has continued to be performed and has used the shows powerful message to address current acts of war. The present iteration of Fire, announced as the show began, was performed in recognition of the current state of war in Yemen. The Olympia Ballroom was packed with audience members of all ages to see the Bread and Puppets show. The seats were all filled and audience members made space on the gymnasium floor to settle in to be a part of Fire. Fire takes place in a Vietnames...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By: Amber [gallery type="slideshow" ids="5113,5112,5110,5142"]   Hello! Would you like to introduce yourself? I’m taylor dow! I graduated from evergreen in the summer of 2014. I make comics and illustrations. At evergreen I studied creative writing and fine art.   Do you wanna talk a little bit about how your Evergreen education gave you some tools for your art that you otherwise wouldn’t have gotten? Yes! Definitely! I think I went to evergreen with the delusion that I was going to an art school. I initially was like, I just wanna study art, I wanna do art so I’m gonna go to this school, they have art programs. I think I was initially kind of confused and disappointed because my class was not all art, I kind of expected it to just be an art school thing but I took a class that was both visual art and creative writing and I didn’t really want to do creative writing. I didn’t really love the class, it wa...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Ruby Love I spoke with artist Loie Warren at Obsidian in downtown Olympia, surrounded by the din of clanking dishes, espresso being made, and the muted conversation of students in the midst of half-heartedly studying. The walls were lined with Loie’s work—richly contrasted black and white photographs, many featuring the artist’s own hands and arms twisting through the shadows. We discussed Warren’s work, the process of analog image making, and the nuances of representing one’s body. The images on display at Obsidian are all analog; either created in the darkroom (as is the case with a particularly interesting set of photograms) or shot in-studio on 35mm or medium format film. While she’d shot digital before, Warren says, “[Digital] doesn’t make sense for me right now. In a world that is already so saturated with photographs, it’s really hard to justify taking another fuuucking photo.” The time and effort and tactility involved ...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Katherine Bussey At the opening for “Not Vanishing: Contemporary Expressions in Indigenous Art 1977-2015”, spectators shared heat and energy, engaging between objects of art and music while celebrating decades of dynamic creativity. A new generation of artists are also being celebrated as they break ground by confronting obsolete social models while embodying the cultural integrity that defined the Contemporary Native American Art movement in the 60’s. Museum of Northwest Art (MoNA)’s gallery space welcomed the viewer to a unique passage through the rich variety of art forms beginning at a curved staircase towards the entrance of the gallery forming a cradle for the piece: “Winter Loon Dance” (1977) by North American Aleut artist John Hoover. At nine feet tall and ten feet in diameter, the cedar panels make a complete circle while the carved figures recede and swell with the subtle colors of applied oil paint. Gail Tremblay, c...