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By EMMA ROTOLO There is an increasing struggle among college students to afford and access food as well as maintain housing. In a research article by Dr. Danielle Gallegos and Kai Ong claim  “There are different levels of food security from worrying about where your next meal is going to come from, to skipping meals or reducing the size of meals to the more severe form when adults and children in a household are feeling hungry.” Jess Mahan is a 20-year-old native Comanche and Hawaiian attending The Evergreen State College with a focus in Indigenous Studies and Law. She is paying for her education almost entirely by taking out loans, with the exception of the federal Pell Grant she was awarded for one year. She comes from a family of nine with a single mother and knows what it feels like to be hungry. “I guess you just get used to being hungry all the time,” Mahan said. [quote] It’s so stressful trying to sit in class, wondering i...

 
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By Felix Asherah Chrome Any given night walking around in downtown Olympia one is likely to encounter a group of people gathered on a corner eating pizza or pastries, drinking coffee, and digging through piles of clothes and blankets. This is the scene surrounding the volunteers who ride for EGYHOP, or the Emma Goldman Youth and Homeless Outreach Program. EGYHOP is an organization that collects donations of food, blankets, medical and first aid supplies, clothes, tents, and more, and distributes them to street-dependent and house-less people downtown from trailers rigged on the back of bike. House-less is a term used, instead of the more common “homeless,” because it more accurately portrays someone’s lack of a house, while home is a subjective word that can mean many things depending on the person and situation. EGYHOP’s mission is about meeting people where they are, and where they need services most, at night when people may ...

 
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By Miriam X. Padilla Nestora Salgado is a naturalized U.S. citizen who grew up in the small indigenous village of Olinala in the state of Guerrero, Mexico. She moved to the United States in 1991 at the age of 20, working as a maid, nanny, and waitress. She split her time between Olinala and Renton, Washington, where she lives with her daughters, grandchildren, and husband, Jose Luis Avila, a construction worker. Over the past four years, she made numerous trips to deliver clothing and supplies to the desperately poor residents of her hometown. Guerrero has the highest murder rate in Mexico and a history of state involvement in massacres of indigenous peasants. During her trips home to Mexico, Salgado witnessed increasing poverty and the rise in violent crime and political corruption. This led her to become a community activist for the human rights of indigenous people in Guerrero and neighboring parts of Mexico. In particular, sh...

 
Campus Life
 

[caption id="attachment_3403" align="alignleft" width="286"] The giant horsetail (Equisetum giganteum) prefers wet, poorly drained soils. The cone or strobilus of the giant horsetail grows on reproductive shoots of the plant, while leafy, green shoots catch sunlight for photosynthesis.[/caption] photos by BLAINE EWIG words by CASSANDRA JOHNSON Plants in the Northwest have officially woken up for spring. The dense “wall of green” that brackets every inch of cement on campus offers even more wonder for the keen observer or curious passerby. The following photo essay offers a few windows into the vast outdoor classroom surrounding Evergreen’s built structures. Horsetails, along with mosses and ferns, are some of the most ancient plants on the Northwest coast. These plants grow in low, water-saturated areas, recalling a time in plant evolution when the Earth was much wetter and flatter. Historically, they preceded flowering plant...

 
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OWNER OF SONSHINE ORGANICS NETWORK SHARES HOW MEDICAL MARIJUANA HAS HELPED HER FAMILY AND COMMUNITY BY RAY STILL [caption id="attachment_3380" align="alignright" width="360"] Vendors sold everything from marijuana plants, to THC infused chapstick. BODHI STANBERRY[/caption] “I have seven doctors,” said Serena Haskins, the owner of Sonshine Organics Network. “Air, water, rest, exercise, diet, sunshine, and cannabis.” Sonshine is a non-profit member cooperative that opened in 2010. The different spelling of “sun” is on purpose—Haskins named her non-profit after her children. Her daughter Hannah developed a large Wilms tumor (a cancer of the kidney) at an early age. While Hannah went through an intensive cancer treatment plan, her parents educated themselves on alternative cannabis treatments, although they never gave it to Hannah during her treatment. After Hannah entered remission, Haskins decided that her daughter or sons woul...

 
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MAY DAY IN PARIS BY PATRICK STEWART [caption id="attachment_3359" align="alignleft" width="360"] Photo by Patrick Stewart[/caption] It was drizzling lightly in Paris when I woke up at the crack of 11:00 a.m. on May the first. A full three hours passed when I had planned on meeting the Confederacion Nacional de Trabajo (National Confederation of Workers, or CNT), an anarchist group with ties to labor rights. Luckily for me, it appeared that anarchists weren’t morning people either, and there was still only a small contingent gathered when I arrived. The plan, from what I could gather, was to march down through the Republique and to the Bastille. This was no random march plan—the downtrodden working class descending into the center of Paris, just like the aristocracy had feared around the time of the revolution. When I arrived, one person was playing traditional worker’s songs on a hurdy-gurdy, and there was plenty of shouting ...

 
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BY JOSH WOLF AND RAY STILL [caption id="attachment_3339" align="alignleft" width="360"] A group of traditional Mexican dancers lead Seattle’s afternoon protest for workers’ rights. EMILY McHUGH[/caption] Some came to demonstrate for workers and immigrant rights. Some came to celebrate the coming of spring. Whatever the reason, May Day in Olympia turned Sylvester Park into a small hub of music, community discussion, and activism for anybody aiming to reform local and national policies. May Day (or International Workers’ Day) was established to commemorate the 1886 Haymarket Massacre. At the time, labor unions across the United States demanded an eight-hour workday, and planned for a national general strike on May 1, 1886. In A People’s History of The United States, historian Howard Zinn puts the number of strikers in the U.S. at 350,000. In Chicago on May 3, with 40,000 workers on strike in the city and while “most of the indus...

 
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"I'D PUT PRISON NEXT TO COLLEGE AS THE BEST PLACE FOR A MAN TO GO IF HE NEEDS TO DO SOME THINKING.  IF HE'S MOTIVATED, IN PRISON HE CAN CHANGE HIS LIFE."  - MALCOLM X BY JAMES GUTSCH [caption id="attachment_3385" align="alignright" width="300"] Green Hill students participate in a Gateways workshop. Photo courtesy of Shauna Bittle.[/caption] When I first heard about Gateways for Incarcerated Youth three years ago, my first thought was: I have nothing to offer these kids. The first time I drove down to Green Hill, the all-male maximum security youth prison, I saw the barbed wire fences, walked through the metal doors, and told myself that this middle class white male, the epitome of privilege in U.S. society, was making a mistake. As the youth walked across the campus, dressed in the mandatory navy blue pants and dark green tops, the thought ran through my mind that I can’t teach a juvenile offender anything he had any interes...

 
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BY SERENA IMANI KORN [caption id="attachment_3286" align="alignleft" width="384"] Album art for "Waiting for 2042"[/caption] When comedian Hari Kondabolu performed at Evergreen in April of last year, there was a mad dash for tickets. They all sold out. But now, nobody has to fight for seats to Kondabolu’s shows. Kondabolu’s debut album, “Waiting for 2042,” brings his stand-up straight to your speakers. Kill Rock Stars, an independent record label that started in Olympia, released “Waiting for 2042” in March, and it was recorded during a show in Oakland. As an intersectional feminist who is dedicated to anti-racism, combating transphobia and homophobia, etc., it can be hard to find comedy artists who don’t constantly offend. There are many “comedians” who think that directly offensive “jokes” are the only way to be funny, including Anthony Jeselnik, who often opens shows with bits about rape and beating up his girlfriend. (Jesel...

 
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BY JAIME NADEL [caption id="attachment_3277" align="aligncenter" width="288"] Illustration by GALEN RIGGS[/caption] Student Galen Riggs has been taking art classes at Evergreen and has quickly progressed in the printmaking technique of intaglio while studying with faculty Lisa Sweet. Originally from San Francisco, the city which shaped him, where young people participate in a culture and environment where life is harshly exposed and on constant display. From skateboarding and chilling with his friends in neighborhoods like the Mission and Lower Haight he’s been witness to some “gnarly shit,” from bum fights to seeing people shit in the streets. Riggs’ instills artifacts of the city into his art. He views the city as a piece of art and is keen on how to navigate obstacles made by humans and humans as obstacles. Moving past the zeitgeist characterized by the sometimes numbing abundance and normativity of art in cyberspace he ha...