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By Chloe Marina Manchester The trial for brothers Andre Thompson and Bryson Chaplin, two young black men who were both shot by white Olympia Police Officer, Ryan Donald, in May 2015, finally began Monday, April 10, almost two years after they were shot. Both Thompson and Chaplin survived the shooting but Chaplin was left partially paralyzed. Now, Thompson and Chaplin are both on trial for second degree assault in relation to their altercation with the officer who shot them. The trial was delayed numerous times, because of a hospitalized judge with a toe injury, approaching holidays after he was released, and then the judge’s retirement. The trial is expected to continue multiple weeks, through the beginning of May, near the two year anniversary of the shooting. As of Monday April 16, Officer Donald has yet to testify. As stated in a previous issue of the Cooper Point Journal, Thompson and Chaplin now face assault charges from an a...

 
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By Felix Chrome On Monday, April 10, inmates at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma Washington began a hunger strike in protest of what they consider to be inhumane conditions in the Detention Center and unjust long detainment periods prior to seeing a judge or being assigned a court date. Some inmates with jobs in the Detention Center, for which they are usually paid one dollar per day, refused to work along, and many are refusing to purchase items from commissary along with the hunger strike. The strike began with just over 100 inmates and by April 13, Northwest Detention Center (NWDC) Resistance stated that 750 inmates had joined the hunger strike, representing over half of the inmates estimated to be currently held in the Detention Center. At the beginning of the strike inmates circulated a list of demands in the Northwest Detention Center. These demands included higher quality food, lower commissary prices, improvements ...

 
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By Chloe Marina Manchester Mayor Ed Murray announced, in a press conference on Wednesday, that the city of Seattle will be suing the Trump administration. This is following a Monday statement from Attorney General Jeff Sessions saying that the Justice Department plans to withhold up to $4.1 billion in federal grant money from “sanctuary cities”—a general term for different municipalities that refuse to comply with requests from immigration agents, such as Immigration and Custom Enforcement (ICE), to detain immigrants who currently lack legal documentation. ICE classifies at least 118 jurisdictions as sanctuaries. In his Monday statement, Sessions said that policies of sanctuary cities “Make our nation less safe by putting dangerous criminals on our streets.” The lawsuit was filed in United States District Court in Seattle, citing concerns that the Executive Order signed by Trump in January creates uncertainty over the city’s budge...

 
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By Jasmine Kozak Gilroy Anne Buck, owner of Buck’s Fifth Avenue, was tired of being met each morning by folks sleeping in her doorway, and tired of cleaning up after them, so she built a wall around her doorway with a lock to keep people out. Soon after, the city responded with a public statement and a Notice of Violation requiring her to either take down the wall or get a permit to build something that fits the City’s guidelines. According to the statement, Buck’s wall has been deemed in violation because Buck did not go through the permitting and inspection process, the door on the wall does not feature the proper panic hardware needed to exit swiftly in case of emergency, and because the shop resides in a historic building and Buck did not submit the plans to the design review process prior to construction. In their own words, “The issue is not that Ms. Buck took action to stop the negative activity happening in her alcove. The ...

 
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By Jasmine Kozak-Gilroy and Felix Chrome On Saturday March 4 an estimated 200 Trump supporters gathered at Heritage Park, for the “Spirit of America” rally celebrating Trumps policies, as well as conservative and nationalist themes. They were joined by approximately 125 counter-protesters, denouncing Trump and what he stands for, and about 100 police officers, primarily Washington State Patrol dressed in riot gear, with Olympia Police Department Officers on bicycles for backup. Four people, one minor and three adults, all with the counter demonstration, were arrested at the beginning of the event. The details of the incident are unclear, but they were arrested for allegedly assaulting a police officer, possibly after a scuffle between pro-Trump rally attendees and counter protesters. The police officer drove himself to the hospital and was not reported to have any serious injuries, but said someone threw an unknown substance on him...

 
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By Chloe Marina Manchester On Monday, March 6, President Donald Trump issued a new executive order updating previous ban on immigration and travel from six majority Muslim countries. On Thursday, March 9, Washington state Attorney General Bob Ferguson said that Washington state would again take Trump to court to extend the restraining order issued in response to the original ban to this new ban in an effort to block the enforcement of the order. The new travel ban is largely the same as the original executive order, with many calling it the “Muslim ban 2.0.” One difference is that it did not immediately go into effect, so people in the air or just arriving at airports should not be affected, something the original order was widely criticized for. The new ban is set to go into effect March 16, ten days after Trump’s announcement of the new ban, and be in effect for 90 days. The previous ban was put into effect immediately after it ...

 
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By Jasmine Kozak-Gilroy On March 10 Senate Bill 5280 (SB 5280) passed in the Senate chamber with a 35–14 vote, allowing it to move forward into the House. SB 5280’s intended purpose is stated as “making crimes and threats against persons because of their occupation as a law enforcement officer a hate crime.” As it stands right now, Washington State Legislation RCW 9a.36.080 makes it a Class C felony if a person threatens or injures someone “maliciously and intentionally… because of his or her perception of the victim’s race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, or mental, physical, or sensory handicap.” SB 5280 would amend this list of classes covered by statute to include “occupation as a law enforcement officer.” On March 13 the Senate bill will go to the House, where a similar bill was introduced but did not receive a hearing. The Senate Bill received bipartisan support, although being sponsore...

 
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By Chloe Marina Manchester The trial for brothers Andre Thompson and Bryson Chaplin, two young black men who were both shot by white Olympia police officer, Ryan Donald, in May 2015, has been delayed again, with no new date set and no judge assigned. Thompson and Chaplin were shot by Officer Donald after being suspected of attempting to shoplift beer from a Safeway on the westside of Olympia. Both were unarmed at the time of the shooting but Officer Donald claims that he was assaulted and feared for his life. The brothers dispute this allegation and Donald was not severely injured in the incident. Both Thompson and Chaplin survived the shooting but Chaplin was left partially paralyzed. Thompson and Chaplin now face assault charges from an alleged attack on Donald, in which he claims they threatened him with a skateboard. At the time Prosecutor Jon Tunheim stated, “In my view, the way the skateboard was described as being used meet...

 
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By Jasmine Kozak Gilroy On February 10 Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers arrested and detained 23 year old Daniel Ramirez Medina, an immigrant and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) recipient who has been living in the United States since he was seven years old. Ramirez Medina was first taken to a processing center in Tukwila, Washington, and then moved to the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC), a private immigration prison located in Tacoma, where he has been held ever since. Ramirez Medina and his lawyers maintain that his arrest and detainment were unlawful and unjustified and have filled two separate appeals for his release, both of which have been denied. DACA, an executive action initiated under the Obama administration, allows undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children to apply for grants of deferred action from deportation or other related legal action, which also allows th...

 
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By Tari Gunstone On Wednesday February 8, the Seattle city council voted unanimously to divest the city’s annual funds of nearly four billion dollars from Wells Fargo over concerns of the bank’s funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in addition to questions regarding the bank’s transparency and integrity. The Ordinance of Socially Responsible Banking, that will divest the city’s funds from Wells Fargo when their contract is up in 2018, was proposed by Matt Remle of the Lakota Tribe, a member of the Defund DAPL coalition. Remle and Defund DAPL worked in close partnership with Seattle councilmember Kshama Sawant to bring the ordinance to vote. Remle and Sawant worked together previously when she sponsored Remle’s plan for an indigenous people’s day in Seattle. Sawant has been a consistent supporter for indigenous people’s rights, stating of this ordinance that, “This is the least that elected officials can do to put their mone...