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By Chloe Marina Manchester On January 30, 2017 Washington State Attorney General, Bob Ferguson, and Governor Jay Inslee filed a lawsuit against Donald Trump, in his capacity as president, Homeland Security, The United States of America, and several high ranking members of the Trump administration, include acting Secretary of State, Tom Shannon. The lawsuit is regarding the executive order, Protecting the Nation from Foreign Terrorist Entry into the United States, better known as the “immigration ban” or “the Muslim ban” signed by President Trump on January 28. The lawsuit claims that the executive order violates the Fifth Amendment of the Constitution, specifically the due process clause, as well as the First Amendment’s Establishment clause. The lawsuit specifically states, “The Establishment Clause of the First Amendment prohibits the federal government from officially preferring one religion over another. Sections 3 and 5 of the...

 
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by Tari Gunstone On Wednesday February 8 the Seattle city council voted unanimously to break partnership with Wells Fargo in handling their city’s annual funds of nearly 4 billion over concerns of the bank’s funding of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL) in addition to questions regarding the bank’s transparency and integrity. The Ordinance of Socially Responsible Banking that will divest the city’s funds from Wells Fargo when their contract is up in 2018 was proposed by Matt Remle of the Lakota Tribe, a member of the Defund DAPL coalition. Remle and Defund DAPL worked in close partnership with Socialist Seattle councilmember Kshama Sawant to bring the ordinance to vote. Remle and Sawant worked together previously when she sponsored Remle’s plan for an indigenous people’s day in Seattle. Sawant has been a consistent supporter for indigenous people’s rights, stating of this ordinance that, “This is the least that elected officials can ...

 
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By Jon Fitzgerald On January 21, people on every continent gathered in a series of women’s marches as a declaration of unity and power. The marches, spawning from the original event planned for Washington, D.C., gained massive momentum as over three million people worldwide participated in what is now being called the largest single-day protest in American history. One of the many so-called sister marches was organized in Olympia, attracting a crowd the Olympia police estimated as ten thousand people. The protests were largely in response to Trump’s inauguration and policy proposals, but also to promote unity against sexism, racism and hate. The Olympia march started at 10 a.m., with a massive crowd of people gathering in front of the legislative building on the capitol grounds. The march started down Columbia Street, turning at Legion Way, and coming back up Capitol Way to rally on the Capitol grounds. One marcher said that as the...

 
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By Jasmine Kozak-Gilroy On January 11, 2016, the new Evergreen chief of police, Stacy Brown, was set to be sworn in. Brown, who graduated from the college in 2006, was hired out of the Lewis County Deputy’s office where she had been working for 20 years, the last seven of which she spent as the chief deputy of Special Services. On the afternoon the administration planned to hold a welcome reception for Chief Brown, minutes before the program was set to begin, students took the microphone and created a loud disruption so the event could not go forward. Along with air horn like noise makers, students yelled “Fuck the Police!” and “Death to Pigs”. When it seemed clear that the students were not going to quiet down or surrender the microphone and podium, Evergreen president George Bridges, chief of police Stacy Brown, and the other members of the administration putting on the event left and the reception was effectively cancelled. In a...

 
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By Felix Chrome Nationally and locally January 20 seems to have the potential to be a wild, action filled day, with a wide variety of events planned. There have been calls for protests and demonstrations of various forms to take place across the country on inauguration day, many using the moniker #DisruptJ20. Olympia has a somewhat confusing tangle of events planned, however in our small town it’s likely these will merge into a general atmosphere of protest, with loosely affiliated groups participating in differing actions simultaneously. There is a general strike called for the day, with many posters emblazoned with slogans such as “Nobody Works. Nothing Moves.” “Everything stops. No work. No School. No Cops. No Trump.” and “Sabotage the machinery of the state before fascists seize it” spotted on campus and around town. At 9 a.m. on Jan. 20 there is a youth-led rally against Trump at the state capitol, near 416 Sid Snyder Ave SW....

 
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By Jennifer Hicks In October of this year POC Talk was contacted by a Evergreen Student and former Geoduck Basketball player about alleged racism and harassment they experienced while on the basketball team here at Evergreen. The reason for this request was that they felt that the school lacks transparency when it comes to discriminatory treatment of students of color on campus and the way they handle the offenders. The student, who has requested to remain anonymous, submitted a Title 9 discrimination case against current Women’s Basketball Coach Jennifer Schooler in February of this year. In support of this student POC Talk has decided to publish the findings of this Title 9 case. First some background on Jennifer Schooler. Schooler, who has self identified as a person of color herself, has been head coach of the women’s basketball team since May 2014 and served as assistant coach for 4 seasons under Monica Heuer before taking ove...

 
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By Chloe Marina Manchester On November 11, a group of anti-fracking protesters, collectively dubbed Olympia Stand, blocked a train coming from the Port of Olympia carrying frackings sands, or proppants. The train was successfully blocked on that first day, then protesters erected a blockade where they camped on the tracks for a week. The blockade lasted just a week before the police, in full riot gear, dismantled the camp in the early hours of Friday Nov. 18, ending in the arrests of twelve protesters. The Port of Olympia handles the proppants for a company called Rainbow Ceramic Sands of China and Houston. During the initial hours of the protest, when protesters were blocking the tracks at State and Jefferson, the train carrying proppants advanced toward them and then, when it became clear they would not move, reversed back into the Port. After the first night of protests, the camp moved down the the railroad tracks located at Sev...

 
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By Rachel Carlson, Chloe Marina Manchester, Tari Gunstone, & Felix Chrome Since the election of Donald Trump it seems like the meme-worthy craziness of 2016 is only set to continue into the new year. This year has been characterized by contentious battles and increasingly disparate rhetoric on issues from police brutality to fossil fuel extraction. The election seems to have contributed anger and energy to many ongoing political battles, as well as stirring up new fears and oppositions. Reactions varied as much as views in the region do, with some calling the pending Trump regime white supremacist and potentially fascist and others saying they wish to heal divisions in our country. Here are some of the things we saw. Olympia November 9, the morning after the election, started with a school walk out for all of the Evergreen campus. As planned, students left their classes at 11 a.m. and gathered in Red Square to voice their frus...

 
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By Tari Gunstone Around 200 people gathered on the steps of the Capitol on Thursday, October 22 to demand accountability for police violence, specifically against black lives and native lives in Washington state. The gathering focused on promoting Initiative-837 (I-837), which would rephrase a Washington statute that makes it incredibly difficult to prosecute police for use of deadly force, aiming to make it easier to take legal action against police violence. Activists are currently promoting the initiative and gathering voter signatures in order to force the Washington State Legislature to vote on it. Protest signs represented slogans like, “Safer policing, safer community support,” “Bullies with Badges,” “Native Lives Matter,” “Black Lives Matter,” and many that read “Justice For Jackie,” referring to Jacquelyn Salyers, a pregnant indigenous woman from the Puyallup tribe, killed by police in January 2016. Throughout the p...

 
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By Jon Fitzgerald Last week, members of the community started contacting members of  City Hall to open up a shelter for the coming wind and rainstorm, which was expected to have up to sixty mile an hour winds and large amounts of rain. Despite calls for a shelter to open and the general approval by city council members, the city did not take any actions, and members of the community stepped up to open a shelter for people in need. Just Housing, a grassroots movement for housing justice in Olympia, was largely behind the emergency maneuver and have found renewed energy in their successful call-to-action, continuing to rally for action from city council to benefit of the homeless community. My partner and I stopped by First Christian Church on Friday afternoon. We had heard the shelter had opened out of necessity because of the storm and we dropped off some blankets and socks. Inside there was a space for sleeping, a space for...