Posts Tagged ‘artist statement’
 
 
 
Arts & Culture
 

Jessica Maia Rasmussen, a senior at Evergreen, left the ART/ WORK program in the Spring to work as a exhibition intern at documenta14 in Kassel, Germany. Documenta is an arts exhibition started as a post-war revitalization project in 1955, that has historically focused on conceptual art. For documenta14, the exhibition takes the form of a “bi-locational” event that took place in Kassel, Germany and Athens, Greece, in hopes that it will draw the attention of the art world towards the refugee crisis and the questions that emerge from it. Jessica Maia Rasmussen is now working on finishing her academic statement to formally graduate before pursuing more training in classical painting in Chicago. I applied to the exhibition documenta14 because I was interested in studying an exhibition that was politically engaged. In my senior program Art/Work I was studying art theory, philosophy, and studio arts which supported my interest and purs...

 
Arts & Culture
 

Tari Gunstone works professionally as a portrait and event photographer while studying Environmental Photojournalism and Botany at Evergreen. She also writes and photographs for the Cooper Point Journal. You can find her work at www.tarigunstone.com The poet Mary Oliver wrote that, “to pay attention is our endless work.” That has become my personal mantra for both my photography work and my general lifestyle. This collection of photographs, Field Guide, reflects my interest in applying that observation to the forests of the Pacific Northwest. In 2014, I had the opportunity to spend a year living on a Monastic farm in the San Juan Islands. In between farm duties, I explored the vast landscape of wilderness that the remote seven-mile long island I was on offered. With the help of the quaint, volunteer-run library, I equipped myself with enough books to become a fledgling naturalist. I photographed and wrote of my observations of the n...

 
Arts & Culture
 

Photography—both creating and viewing it­­—always seems like a continuous experiment in what to reveal and what to obscure. I use photography to attempt to process the world as it happens, to reflect the way I view people, and to come to terms with the speed with which time passes by. There is a sobering reality in realizing that two photos taken seconds apart are completely different; an understanding that the moment has passed and is never going to happen again. At the same time, while I love viewing detailed photographs, I try not to seek out large amounts of detail to capture because it is so pleasing to me to find tiny things in my daily surroundings I never would have noticed unless spending hours agonizing on how to print every inch of a photo just right. These photos are from three separate series I recently used as class assignments; Reveal the Concealed, Body Horror/Body Beauty, and Vulnerability. I attempted to strongly...

 
Arts & Culture
 

IV. I leave the mess. Piss stains color paper, and cd cases crack under my heels. I put on nice shirts and look in the mirror. Two weeks later I carry the mess to the dumpster. I ask about my blood in the jar. You say you poured it in the dirt. He says he misses seeing it in the fridge. I do not believe you. I lie awake all night. My body fights to stay still like it fights to float in water. Get out, to the porch. Lay down my cheek on unfinished wood and watch the light come into the sky. I will find a way back to you Call your name. Call your number. Call your mother. Call. Swallow it. Drip rose water on my head, then around the room. Make a list. Stretch. Return, to the floor. Arrange a grouping of rocks. Put the floor on my back and the book on my knees and hold her up. V. until the mess no longer holds my attention and must be done away with. I begin by making a mess VI. A book of picture riddles VII. Start with a...

 
Arts & Culture
 

I take photographs because they let me represent myself through an image. I feel stronger when I am taking photographs, I feel a sense of purpose. I enjoy documenting other artists at work and my personal work is often about double standards in society, marginalized voices, and longing. My work here is about body image, the teeth are candy and represent the double standards in society about personal hygiene for men and women. The candy represents the arrested psychological development of a young person trying to become an adult. This still life of candy teeth represents body issues and the lack representation of realistic women in popular media and modern art. The empty plate is about body image, double standards in society about food consumption, and how much we waste while others starve. The emptiness of the plate is meant to express spiritual hunger, and a single grape which is a recurring image in my art represents longing for ...

 
Arts & Culture
 

I have spent the last three years in Olympia, growing, running into the same 13 people on the Westside, and most importantly, learning that I could bring parts of my freaky, outrageous inside world to the outside. My art is inspired by the different behaviors of humans, humor, what they react to, what they do/do not seem to care about.  Dolly Parton, Kris Jenner, my sister, Diana Ross, Oprah Winfrey, Mariah Carey, and Leandra Medine-Cohen. I want my art to make people feel a range of emotions. I strongly believe that experiencing and expressing all emotions is to live life to the fullest. My art is meant to challenge, confuse, and cause discomfort in folks of all walks of life. I do not make art to make you feel good or bad.

 
Artist Statement
 

by Megan Bailey Still lifes are often under-recognized and have sank to one of the lesser respected forms in the hierarchy of art genres, sometimes considered to be used as a preliminary study of form, composition, and value. In all honesty, I did not appreciate drawing still lifes and found them quite unexciting, until I was introduced to the work of Manny Farber’s still lifes in 2012, whose work has deeply and continually influenced mine my work.  Farber used a birds-eye perspective, creating contemporary and dynamic still-life composition. Most importantly, Farber used objects from his life to create a narrative painting. Influenced by Farber, I use an aerial perspective by placing the objects directly onto the canvas or paper. The composition is not fully visible until the objects are removed from the material, and the drawing or painting is hung on the wall. I further delineate the foreground by keeping the background solid, f...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

I photograph things that don’t appear to have much beauty on the surface; their essence may be dark and ugly. The purpose is to create a more dynamic, universal aesthetic, to evoke unfamiliar feelings. I was drawn to this project by unanswered questions and mystery. It’s likely this series wouldn’t have occurred without the guidance of a documentary photography program taught by Steve Davis at the Evergreen State College. Our final project required us to work with real people, events, and places. This work comes from an investigation into the final days of a local abandoned structure. The building’s history includes multiple oil spills and owners. Every attempt to contact any entity or person affiliated with the building remained unreturned. The unexpected demolition in March of 2016 marked the end of my work. [gallery type="slideshow" ids="5600,5602,5603"]

 
Artist Statement
 

By Ruby Thompson If you’ve picked up an issue of this newspaper in the past four years, you have seen at least one thing that I’ve drawn. When I came to Evergreen, the Cooper Point Journal was just going back into print form after being solely web-based, and the editor-in-chief at the time was starting everything over from practically nothing. Right now I’m looking at my stack of newspapers, and I am amazed by how much the CPJ has changed, and how much my illustration and artwork has evolved. My identity as an illustrator is separate from my identity as an artist. Illustration is problem-solving for me: I have this box, and within it I have to complement this article in an easy-to-understand and aesthetically pleasing way. It has never stopped being a challenge, which is a big part of why I have continued to do it. In my own art practice I examine how we categorize things in all aspects of life—scientific taxonomy, subculture...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Felix Chrome Blaine Ewig is a poet and photographer. An Evergreen graduate, she used to work at the Cooper Point Journal as our Arts & Culture Editor, and you can find her photographs in many issues of the CPJ. Taylor Sikorski, also an Evergreen Alum, is a comedian, videographer, and photographer. She recently began organizing a comedy open mic focused on providing a platform for women and queer comedians, and works for the public television. After a couple beers, I sat down to chat with them over garlic fries as Le Voyeur. Cooper Point Journal: What is your collaboration process is like? Taylor Sikorski: We both joked about how we are both pushovers but we can be really assertive when we want to be, so that’s been really helpful, we’re both pushovers and not pushovers. Usually we’ll just text each other with weird visuals we get or ideas, it will be out of nowhere like, ‘i just had this idea for a shoot i want to do’ then ...