Posts Tagged ‘Campus Events’
 
 
 
Community
 

By Sylvie Chace On Thursday, May 18, author of “This Changes Everything” and “The Shock Doctrine”, Naomi Klein will speak at the Costantino Recreation Center. Naomi Klein is a Canadian journalist and climate justic activist well-known for being critical of corporate globalization in relation to climate change and other social justice issues. Her books discuss capitalism and its role in this greater global issue and her writings have often served as crucial program text at Evergreen. In 2016, Klein delivered the Sydney Peace Prize Lecture in Sydney, Australia upon being awarded the Peace Prize for exposing truths behind climate justice politics and encouraging activism and awareness. Her work aims to encourage transformative justice through revealing these truths, and her appearance at Evergreen is anticipated to be a popular and exciting event. Klein’s new book is titled “No is Not Enough, Resisting Trump’s Shock Politics and Winn...

 
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By Sylvie Chace The Black Cottonwood Collective is hosting the Rising Spring Convergence, an event spanning three days, from April 21 to the 23. The Rising SPRING (Stopping Pipelines and Resisting Infrastructure on Native Ground) Convergence is an event and opportunity to listen to and learn from indigenous water protectors. The experiences of those on the frontline of this struggle will be highlighted and shared in workshops, presentations, and discussions. Each day brings events and workshops that require no registry to attend. When asked about the significance of the convergence, The Black Cottonwood Collective stated, “Though the camps at Standing Rock may have been evicted, the struggle against fossil fuel infrastructure continues. Every day that passes is another day where pipeline planning and construction continues. There are multiple fossil fuel infrastructure projects slated for the Pacific Northwest and, as in Standing R...

 
Community
 

By Chloe Marina Manchester Together, Day of Absence and Day of Presence make up an annual two day event for all members of the Evergreen community to explore issues of race, equality, allyship, inclusion, and privilege. This year’s theme is “Revolution is not a one-time event; your silence will not protect you”, inspired by Audre Lorde. The Evergreen Day of Absence began as a collective action organized by Evergreen faculty and staff of color in the early 1970s, when retired faculty and founder of the Tacoma campus Maxine Mimms saw a play by Douglas Turner Ward in which a town in the South awakens to find that all of the Black community members have disappeared, causing the remaining white townsfolk to face life without them. The play, performed as a “reverse minstrel show,” was cast entirely by Black actors wearing white face, satirizing the traditional racist minstrel shows, and commenting on the necessity of African American com...

 
Community
 

By Chloe Marina Manchester Safer Steps is a new program designed to raise awareness of the public services offered by campus police, such as unlocking doors, jumping cars, and escorting students who are afraid to walk alone around campus. Prior to the program, police already offered many of these services, performing more than 500 of these public services in the last year. They have started this program to try to encourage students to feel more comfortable reaching out to campus police for help. However this program is not perfect, there are marginalized students who are fearful of police, specifically students of color who are subject to systematic racism from the police on a national scale, and these students are unlikely to call the campus police for an escort if they already felt unsafe walking around on campus. Marginalized students are also more likely to be those who are feel most threatened walking around campus after dark...

 
Community
 

By Chloe Marina Manchester On April 6, Students, staff, and faculty celebrated the annual Evergreen Day of Absence event, followed two days later by its counterpart, Day of Presence. These events were created to address issues of race, inclusion, diversity, privilege, and allyship on the Evergreen campus and beyond. For Day of Absence faculty, staff, and students of color were invited to the Lacey Community Center to participate in a full day of educational programs and workshops designed to address social issues around race from the perspectives of people of color. The activities included a wide variety of offerings including a journaling workshop on the theme “the complexity of belonging,” a capoeira workshop, and small-group discussion titled “empowering ourselves and mentoring others.” The events in Lacey ended with a keynote address by Leticia Nieto, an artist and faculty member at St. Martin’s College. Nieto’s address focused...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Ruby Love, Sarah Bradley, & Jasmine Kozak Gilroy WEDNESDAY 4/20 MEXICO: Government Repression Grows Against Indigenous Self-Defense Forces Evergreen Library. 6:30 pm. On Wednesday, a panel of speakers will meet in the Library to “explore the politicized incarceration of Nestora Salgado, neoliberalism, and the Drug War in Mexico as well as touch on indigenous, feminist, and ecological justice movements in Mexico.” The event features five different speakers, each planning to focus on a specific topic related to the event’s overall theme. According to the event’s Facebook page, the speakers include: Nestora Salgado, “Indigenous leader, a naturalized U.S. citizen, and ex-political prisoner in Mexico.” She was detained by Mexican federal soldiers in 2013 as a result of her activism. She was held in a maximum security prison and denied contact with her attorney and her family. Dr. Filiberto Barajas-Lopez, U.W. College of Educ...

 
Community
 

By Aria Cummings The Liberal Arts Forum takes place every winter quarter, centered on a different theme deemed significant to students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members. This year’s focus was the changing nature of the American family structure and how the idea of “traditional family” has evolved over time. The Liberal Arts Forum is put on by Evening and Weekend Studies program. The guest speaker chosen to speak at this year’s forum was Stephanie Coontz, a retired Evergreen faculty member who has written several books. Coontz taught history and family studies at Evergreen for more than 30 years, and is the author of The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap; A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s; and Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. She has also appeared on late night television, talk shows, and several prime-time documentaries. Coo...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Jules Prosser We went undercover. We didn’t know why or how, but we were on a quest for “the truth”. Carol got a fancy secret recorder from Media Loan, and I didn’t even have to ask her to do that, even though I considered it. I needed her—she was good at this shit, and knew what was up. Carol never fails. Since we were incognito, we had to have fake identities. I suggested porn star names because I’m fucking boring. Carol had a better idea. We both have bags with different names Sharpied on them. “Carol” is on hers, obviously, and “Alexis” is on mine. She suggested we use them. She’s so smart. Carol was a standard hot Bo Peep, pink and pretty, with her cascading red hair and garter belt. I dressed up as a maenad, AKA a slutwife of Dionysus, AKA a crazy creature who incites drunken orgies. It was a recycled Halloween costume, but fuck it. I looked okay in my ill-fitting red dress and janky papier-mâchéd horns. My companion lent...

 
Campus Life
 

By Seth Leuck On Friday April 10, at Evergreen’s Longhouse, comedy was king. In front of a packed house, headliner and famous Australian comic Aamer Rahman, and openers Khadija Hassan and Abraham Tadesse brought the audience to their knees with jokes about everything from race, religion, and privilege, to masturbation and  Mormons. As part of Day of Presence, comedians of color were invited to perform stand up routines, and the results were nothing less than fantastic. Day of Absence and its counterpart Day of Presence are two days of campus activities designed to encourage discussion about race, inclusion, diversity and allyship. The night opened with Evergreen alum Abraham Tadesse, whose jokes ranged from stories about blacking after a series of Bacardi 151 shots, an episode of public urination,  and running from the police. If you’re guessing these things are directly related, you are correct.  He also relived some of his mos...