Posts Tagged ‘Evergreen Faculty’
 
 
 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love Kabby Mitchell, III, celebrated performer, choreographer, mentor, and Evergreen faculty member passed away last week, Thursday, May 4, at the age of sixty. A member of the faculty since 1998, Mitchell taught interdisciplinary programs in Performing Arts and African American Studies. An acclaimed ballet performer and choreographer, Mitchell taught across many genres, from ballet to Afro-Haitian dance. His career as a teacher spanned more than thirty five years, as he taught in schools and dance academies in Washington, Iowa, and Mexico. According to Evergreen’s memorial page, Mitchell “also taught at a number of other Seattle-area institutions throughout his career, including Cornish College of the Arts, University of Washington, Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences, Spectrum and Ewajo Dance Workshop.” The first African American male soloist to join Seattle’s Pacific Northwest Ballet, Mitchell saw the importance of wor...

 
Letters & Opinion
 

The drama on the staff and faculty DL is burning bright as ever and until it dies down we will be bringing you one email each and every issue. This week’s installment is brought to you by the Cooper Point Journal’s Man of the Year, one mister Bret Weinstein. Day of Absence, which has historically involved students, faculty, and staff of color leaving campus and congressing elsewhere, will instead this year involve requests that all white faculty and students remain absent from campus, leaving the space free for community members of color. Weinstein, and evolutionary biology professor here at Evergreen, is concerned with feeling unwelcome on campus, and instead offers to put together a public lecture concerning race from a “scientific/evolutionary lens.” He sent this email to Rashida Love, Director of First Peoples Multicultural Advising Services. Sent March 15 Dear Rashida, When you first described the new structure for Day of Abs...

 
Community
 

By Aria Cummings The Liberal Arts Forum takes place every winter quarter, centered on a different theme deemed significant to students, faculty, staff, alumni, and community members. This year’s focus was the changing nature of the American family structure and how the idea of “traditional family” has evolved over time. The Liberal Arts Forum is put on by Evening and Weekend Studies program. The guest speaker chosen to speak at this year’s forum was Stephanie Coontz, a retired Evergreen faculty member who has written several books. Coontz taught history and family studies at Evergreen for more than 30 years, and is the author of The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap; A Strange Stirring: The Feminine Mystique and American Women at the Dawn of the 1960s; and Marriage, A History: How Love Conquered Marriage. She has also appeared on late night television, talk shows, and several prime-time documentaries. Coo...