Posts Tagged ‘indigenous rights’
 
 
 
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By Ruby Love, Sarah Bradley, & Jasmine Kozak Gilroy WEDNESDAY 4/20 MEXICO: Government Repression Grows Against Indigenous Self-Defense Forces Evergreen Library. 6:30 pm. On Wednesday, a panel of speakers will meet in the Library to “explore the politicized incarceration of Nestora Salgado, neoliberalism, and the Drug War in Mexico as well as touch on indigenous, feminist, and ecological justice movements in Mexico.” The event features five different speakers, each planning to focus on a specific topic related to the event’s overall theme. According to the event’s Facebook page, the speakers include: Nestora Salgado, “Indigenous leader, a naturalized U.S. citizen, and ex-political prisoner in Mexico.” She was detained by Mexican federal soldiers in 2013 as a result of her activism. She was held in a maximum security prison and denied contact with her attorney and her family. Dr. Filiberto Barajas-Lopez, U.W. College of Educ...

 
News
 

By Chloe Marina Manchester Olympia will celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day for the first time on October 12. This change comes after a proclamation by Mayor Stephen H. Buxbaum was presented in early August. An event commemorating the day will be held in Sylvester Park. Organizer Lala Love said that the community celebration will include a drum circle, a speech from Mayor Buxbaum, speakers from local indigenous tribes, and an open mic for others to share feelings on the day. Whether or not Indigenous Peoples’ Day is technically replacing Columbus Day is uncertain since Olympia does not officially celebrate or recognize Columbus Day, but closes government offices and does not charge for parking on that day. “I think that the city provides free parking on the second day in October, which signifies they think it’s a holiday,” Said Lala Love, a community organizer for the upcoming Indigenous Peoples’ Day celebration. “Not recognizing C...

 
Features
 

By Miriam X. Padilla Nestora Salgado is a naturalized U.S. citizen who grew up in the small indigenous village of Olinala in the state of Guerrero, Mexico. She moved to the United States in 1991 at the age of 20, working as a maid, nanny, and waitress. She split her time between Olinala and Renton, Washington, where she lives with her daughters, grandchildren, and husband, Jose Luis Avila, a construction worker. Over the past four years, she made numerous trips to deliver clothing and supplies to the desperately poor residents of her hometown. Guerrero has the highest murder rate in Mexico and a history of state involvement in massacres of indigenous peasants. During her trips home to Mexico, Salgado witnessed increasing poverty and the rise in violent crime and political corruption. This led her to become a community activist for the human rights of indigenous people in Guerrero and neighboring parts of Mexico. In particular, sh...