Posts Tagged ‘photography’
 
 
 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love Sarah Gluck and Rae Lesinski created the series “Luxury” as a photographic collaboration for their program “Narrative Tableau: Conceptual Strategies in Studio Photography. “Shot on medium format film in Evergreen’s photo studios, the series is an homage to classical still life paintings. The series came about as part of an assignment for Narrative Tableau, where the class was tasked with creating a series of still life images. Inspired by both “original still life paintings” and “reflecting on our culture now,” the two came up with “Luxury”. Speaking of their seires they explain, “The fast food series came about when studying and learning about Still Life paintings, specifically ones that included the circle of life with food. Capturing something that that could be dead soon, but lives in a image forever. A lot of our inspiration was drawn from our surroundings including the very so popular and over consumed, Ronald Mc...

 
Arts & Culture
 

Tari Gunstone works professionally as a portrait and event photographer while studying Environmental Photojournalism and Botany at Evergreen. She also writes and photographs for the Cooper Point Journal. You can find her work at www.tarigunstone.com The poet Mary Oliver wrote that, “to pay attention is our endless work.” That has become my personal mantra for both my photography work and my general lifestyle. This collection of photographs, Field Guide, reflects my interest in applying that observation to the forests of the Pacific Northwest. In 2014, I had the opportunity to spend a year living on a Monastic farm in the San Juan Islands. In between farm duties, I explored the vast landscape of wilderness that the remote seven-mile long island I was on offered. With the help of the quaint, volunteer-run library, I equipped myself with enough books to become a fledgling naturalist. I photographed and wrote of my observations of the n...

 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love Did you know that Evergreen owns a large collection of photographs, including prints from artists like Diane Arbus, Edward Weston, and Jerry Uelsmann, not to mention dozens of Andy Warhol’s Polaroids? Likely not—you probably have never seen a single print. We spoke with Gallery Director Ann Friedman about why that is, and the Evergreen Art Collection’s history, development, and accessibility. If you explore the depths of Evergreen’s official websites, you can eventually find a page called see.evergreen.edu which features a wealth of digital photo galleries like Student Photography, Rare Books Photos, and a massive gallery full of digitized selections from the school’s Archives. One gallery, titled “Evergreen Gallery Photography Collection” contains images of thirty eight photographic prints, the most recognizable of which is probably Diane Arbus’ famous “Child with Hand Grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C. 1962” While any o...

 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love Evergreen’s Galerie Fotoland is playing host to a gorgeous series of wild, mud-splattered portraits by photographer Ryan Richardson. Richardson, who is also the Photography Lab Manager at Evergreen (woo!) shot the series of portraits of cyclists after the 10th anniversary of SSCXWC, or the Single Speed Cyclo-cross World Championships. SSCXWC is known for its mix of “performance art and conspicuous consumption of alcohol” in addition to its focus on the actual race. When the Championships returned to Portland for the 10th anniversary, carrying the mouthful of a title SSCXWCPDX, Richardson knew he wanted to attend and spend some time photographing the competitors. Instead of the usual in-action shots, Richardson opted for a pop-up portrait studio to catch individual riders in their post-race state of exhaustion and euphoria. The crisp, bright lighting and backdrops Richardson chose for the series contrast beautifully wit...

 
Arts & Culture
 

Photography—both creating and viewing it­­—always seems like a continuous experiment in what to reveal and what to obscure. I use photography to attempt to process the world as it happens, to reflect the way I view people, and to come to terms with the speed with which time passes by. There is a sobering reality in realizing that two photos taken seconds apart are completely different; an understanding that the moment has passed and is never going to happen again. At the same time, while I love viewing detailed photographs, I try not to seek out large amounts of detail to capture because it is so pleasing to me to find tiny things in my daily surroundings I never would have noticed unless spending hours agonizing on how to print every inch of a photo just right. These photos are from three separate series I recently used as class assignments; Reveal the Concealed, Body Horror/Body Beauty, and Vulnerability. I attempted to strongly...

 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love Rachel Carlson is a senior at Evergreen, focusing her studies in photography, and graduating this quarter (congratulations, Rachel!) We talked with Rachel about how she got her start in photography, the evolution of her Basque Country series, and what her plans are for after graduation. This issue features her black and white medium format photographs - selections from a series taken in 2015 in the Basque Country. For fall quarter of 2015, Carlson traveled to Europe “to do some museum studies, some art history stuff, and some photography in the Basque Country.” Partially tracing the path of her grandfather, who served in the Basque government and “was exiled to America twice through Cuba,” Carlson says that spending fall quarter in the Basque Country was a “self-discovery, and trying to learn more about my roots and my family.” Choosing to shoot on medium format film was part of Carlson’s work to connect herself to the...

 
Arts & Culture
 

Interview by Ruby Love Kaia Spiliotes Fornes is an Evergreen junior studying photography, dance, and art therapy. Born and raised in Oslo, Kaia - who is Norwegian and Greek - spent her childhood “exploring the fjords of Norway and island hopping around Greece.” This issue’s covers feature her series “The Arctic,” shot in Tromsø, Norway. Kaia started shooting at an early age, inspired by her early travel experiences in Norway and Greece to document the world around her. While she shoots a wide variety of subjects, Kaia is most drawn to the beauty of nature: “The great outdoors is full of awe and mystery. I have been exploring the wonders of nature since childhood. Nature is in the essence of every being. Being at peace and connected with the earth around you is one of the most important ways to live. Nature is a sacred place that I love to photograph.” We asked Kaia about her series “The Arctic” which was shot during the winter of 2...

 
Arts & Culture
 

Blaine is one of my dear friends, she is tough and angry—in the best doesn’t take people’s shit will always have my back in a fight sort of way—and tells me she thinks art is stupid. Yet she takes beautiful, tender, intimate, weird photographs of her friends (including in this case, me) as well as still lifes captured in ways that exude care. She’s traveling right now, so I messaged her some questions from the bar with our friend Joe. In retrospect I realize I should have just asked her about that one time someone punched a Monet. -Felix Chrome Much of your work seems to be focused on bodies, but there is a partialism to it; what is your relationship to the body as an object in your work? I don’t really think about it as partialism. And I don’t necessarily like to think of the body as an object in my photos. All of the bodies I photograph are parts of really interesting people, with different relationships to their bodies and f...

 
Arts & Culture
 

IV. I leave the mess. Piss stains color paper, and cd cases crack under my heels. I put on nice shirts and look in the mirror. Two weeks later I carry the mess to the dumpster. I ask about my blood in the jar. You say you poured it in the dirt. He says he misses seeing it in the fridge. I do not believe you. I lie awake all night. My body fights to stay still like it fights to float in water. Get out, to the porch. Lay down my cheek on unfinished wood and watch the light come into the sky. I will find a way back to you Call your name. Call your number. Call your mother. Call. Swallow it. Drip rose water on my head, then around the room. Make a list. Stretch. Return, to the floor. Arrange a grouping of rocks. Put the floor on my back and the book on my knees and hold her up. V. until the mess no longer holds my attention and must be done away with. I begin by making a mess VI. A book of picture riddles VII. Start with a...

 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love It’s officially the start of winter quarter, and if you’re like me and spent the break in a haze of rich food and existential dread, coming back to school has been a welcome change. Coinciding with the start of the year two thousand and seventeen (oh boy...we’re in the future now…) is a new exhibit at Galerie Fotoland which looks at the nature of time and space using photographs of deceptively cute dioramas. Voyager is the work of Seattle-based photographer Bill Finger, who utilizes techniques learned from his career working around film sets to build miniature worlds. The sets built by Finger vary from lonely country houses, seen at night, to the view of a crater from the window of a plane, to images of space exploration and satellites. Translated through the medium of black and white photography, Finger’s sets take on new meaning, blurring the line between reality/intellectual knowledge and dream/magical thinking as ...