Posts Tagged ‘Procession of the Species’
 
 
 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love Photographs by Tari Gunstone Spring Arts Walk kicked off this past weekend, flooding downtown Olympia with crowds of people. A long-overdue break in the rain on Friday likely contributed to the crowds, as the city seemed to wake from its long hibernation. We started off our art-seeing, music-listening marathon on Friday evening at Salon Refu, where Washington artists Peter Scherrer and Jean Nagai were celebrating the opening of their joint show. Nagai is an Evergreen grad and a former Cooper Point Journal cover artist, so we were especially excited to see his new work! While they work in similar mediums, Scherrer and Nagai work in vastly different styles, even down to their color choices; but their pieces played off of each other nicely. As usual, it was about a hundred degrees in Salon Refu, and packed with people, so we headed on to other things. We caught a parking-space-size band in front of Archibald Sisters...

 
Arts & Culture
 

By Ruby Love It’s that time of year again, and Spring Arts Walk is right around the corner! We’ve combed through the one hundred and seventeen venues (aaahh!) and have a few suggestions for tackling Olympia’s twice-yearly artstravaganza. Spring 2017 Arts Walk kicks off on Friday, April 28, with most venues opening in the early evening. Be sure not to miss the magical “Element of Spirit Luminary Procession,” which starts on Washington St. between 4th and 5th avenues at 9:30 p.m. The art and events continue through Saturday evening, starting with “Chalk in the Streets,” where 7,000 pieces of “colorful chalk” will be passed out, and people are encouraged to “draw the art of nature in the streets” before the Procession of the Species begins. If you’ve never seen either Procession, we highly recommend checking them out if you like enormous papier-mâché animals and glowing trees. We don’t want to pick favorites among the many talented a...

 
Community
 

By Tari Gunstone On Saturday, April 1, environmental groups and earth-loving individuals gathered at the Capitol steps to kick-off Washington’s first official Earth Month celebration. The campaign to expand Earth Day, April 22, to the entire month of April was spearheaded by a father-daughter duo, David and Whitney Sederberg. The campaign’s motto, one day is not enough, speaks to the Sederbergs’ feeling that one day to celebrate the earth, our home and source of sustenance, is insufficient. One of their signs read, “even groundhogs get a day.” The idea started when the family was driving during Seahawks season and sparked a conversation in reaction to all the 12th man flags lining people’s yards. They asked themselves what they felt loyalty toward and what it might look like to share that sense of passion. Last year, they distributed one hundred earth flags to schools and businesses and contacted the city of Olympia to ask about ha...

 
Arts & Culture
 

By Chloe Marina Manchester Arts Walk is a biannual (the one that’s twice a year, not the one that’s every two years) event in downtown Olympia where most of the businesses in downtown showcase exhibits from one or multiple artists. There are street performers, rain, and a mixture of downtown and Evergreen freaks and weirdos along with adorably wholesome families. I’m not gonna lie, I think spring arts walk is better; it’s less cold and depressing, less dark at an unreasonably early hour, and there are two parades. I’m a sucker for a parade. On Friday night, I walked the two miles down the hill from my friend’s apartment to downtown with the sole goal of getting food before we event attempted to walk around and look at stuff. The new ramen place down town may be genteriffic, but it has reasonably good food, I got to admit. Pro tip: bring in your own hot sauce, they would probably yell at you but things are never spicy enough in this...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Felix Chrome & Jasmine Kozak Gilroy Spring is here! Which means it’s time for another Arts Walk, and Procession of the Species. This years events will be taking place on Friday, April 22 from 5 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, April 23 from Noon to 8 p.m. If you haven’t been to one, Arts Walk is an event that takes over downtown twice a year, closing the streets to cars so people can wander seeing art and performances by local artists on the sidewalks of Olympia and in various downtown businesses. This year’s Arts Walk boasts over 100 businesses, hosting work by local artists including Evergreen students and alum, and over 75 live performances in the downtown core. Spring Arts Walk is extra special because it also includes Procession of the Species and Luminary Procession in its festivities. Luminary Procession will take place 9:30 p.m. Friday night, and Procession of the Species will be at 4:30 p.m. the next day. Luminary Processio...

 
Arts & Entertainment
 

By Phoebe Celeste Started in 1995 as a way to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Earth Day and the renewal of the Endangered Species Act, The Procession of the Species is a popular, uniquely Olympian event. The event essentially consists of a group of participants dressing up to represent creatures from the natural world and parading down 5th Avenue on foot, with spectators attending the event as well. The night prior to the Procession of the Species, there is a smaller Luminary Procession, featuring a parade of light sculptures, which takes place during the Olympia Spring Arts Walk. The celebration has earned recognition throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond, with a number of other processions popping up in mimicry of the concept. Costumes for the Procession of the Species include different species of animals and plants as well as natural elements. Some Evergreen programs create costumes for the event annually. This ...

 
Features
 

BY EMILY McHUGH [caption id="attachment_3263" align="alignright" width="384"] Illustration by Ruby Thompson[/caption] With the annual Procession of the Species just around the corner, founder Eli Sterling recalls his own discovery of myth and how it inspired him to begin Olympia’s finest tradition. The Procession of the Species has for years been a staple of Olympia cultural life, exposing the most eccentric aspects of the community in an annual spring gala. Humming packs of dancers dressed as bumblebees in tutus, giant paper-mache worms mounted on repurposed boat carts, and twirling troops of skipping wind sprites has come to characterize Olympia’s spring Arts Walk season, drawing hundreds of people to the streets of downtown whether to participate in the procession or to revisit the imagination of their childhood from the sidelines as the four elements of earth shimmy, spark, crawl, and flow towards the waterfront. But the ph...