Posts Tagged ‘Protests’
 
 
 
News
 

By Jasmine Kozak-Gilroy 2017 was a historic year for The Evergreen State College, blasting us into the public discourse and bringing with it unprecedented media attention. The quick succession of events and over saturation of outside media sources has created confusion over causality and what, exactly, went down last spring. This timeline, created with input from students, staff, and faculty, serves to chronicle the months leading up to, and following, the now infamous protests. Protest at Convocation Two student protesters took the stage during a question and answer session with the invited speaker holding a sign that said, “Evergreen cashes diversity checks but doesn’t care about blacks”. President George Bridges interrupted the students, thanked them for vocalizing their conc erns, and said that they would have more time to speak on issues of race on campus after the Q & A ended, a promise that was never realized. Equity E...

 
Letters & Opinion
 

By Jasmine Kozak-Gilroy Police, on or off campus, are positioned as protectors of the safety of all citizens, an illusion that comes in conflict with the reality of violence routinely committed against protesters, regardless of the tactics protesters choose to employ. Instances of police aggression against protestors in the form of pepper spray, flash bangs, and body to body violence is not just seen during so-called riots, but experienced during marches and peaceful occupations of space. Critiques of the institution of policing are often brushed off as extremist or fantastic exaggerations, but problems with the police are based in the very logic of policing. Police are commissioned to maintain order, the current order of the world, and thus always inherently work in favor of the status quo. Police are peace keepers, but the kind of peace they keep is not peace as an end to structural violence, but a peace based in non disruption o...

 
News
 

By Chloe Marina Manchester The trial for brothers Andre Thompson and Bryson Chaplin, two young black men who were both shot by white Olympia police officer, Ryan Donald, in May 2015, has been delayed again, with no new date set and no judge assigned. Thompson and Chaplin were shot by Officer Donald after being suspected of attempting to shoplift beer from a Safeway on the westside of Olympia. Both were unarmed at the time of the shooting but Officer Donald claims that he was assaulted and feared for his life. The brothers dispute this allegation and Donald was not severely injured in the incident. Both Thompson and Chaplin survived the shooting but Chaplin was left partially paralyzed. Thompson and Chaplin now face assault charges from an alleged attack on Donald, in which he claims they threatened him with a skateboard. At the time Prosecutor Jon Tunheim stated, “In my view, the way the skateboard was described as being used meet...

 
News
 

By Felix Chrome Nationally and locally January 20 seems to have the potential to be a wild, action filled day, with a wide variety of events planned. There have been calls for protests and demonstrations of various forms to take place across the country on inauguration day, many using the moniker #DisruptJ20. Olympia has a somewhat confusing tangle of events planned, however in our small town it’s likely these will merge into a general atmosphere of protest, with loosely affiliated groups participating in differing actions simultaneously. There is a general strike called for the day, with many posters emblazoned with slogans such as “Nobody Works. Nothing Moves.” “Everything stops. No work. No School. No Cops. No Trump.” and “Sabotage the machinery of the state before fascists seize it” spotted on campus and around town. At 9 a.m. on Jan. 20 there is a youth-led rally against Trump at the state capitol, near 416 Sid Snyder Ave SW....

 
Community
 

Recently there has been several instances of direct action at Evergreen involving the interruption of planned school events, including the protest at convocation, the opening of Purce hall, and more recently the welcome reception Evergreen’s new police chief. AR Rushet and Lawrence Walker III are two queer and trans disabled/nonable normative, femmes of color, who are involved in direct action in response to the school’s handling of  issues of diversity and equity for students. There is a consensus among many minority students that the school is great at issuing statements and creating task forces but tends to lack any sort of follow through or action that changes the experience of minority students on campus. Rushet and Walker were interviewed by my colleague Tari Gunstone after the convocation disruption as to why they felt that action was needed. Their responses resonated with me as a student of color; that there is an overall fe...

 
News
 

By Felix Chrome Protests erupted once again after Thurston County Prosecutor Jon Tunheim announced that Officer Ryan Donald would not be prosecuted for the shooting of two unarmed black men, bothers Bryson Chaplin and Andre Thompson. He also announced that Chaplin and Thompson would face assault charges. On May 21st Olympians awoke to news that Olympia Police Officer Donald had shot Chaplin, 21, and Thompson, 24, around 1 a.m. after responding to a 911 call about attempted shoplifting from a nearby Safeway.The shooting sparked outrage and large protests that garnered national media attention. After months of investigation by the Thurston County Critical Incident Team, a group headed by the Thurston County Sheriff's Office and comprised of detectives from various local police agencies, an evidence report was Submitted to the Prosecutor's Office. While the prosecutor made a final decision, reading the evidence released to the pu...

 
Community
 

By Josh Wolf The Pacific Northwest has a strong history of protest, and on May 1, Olympia, Seattle, and Portland will continue the tradition of marching in the streets to celebrate May Day. While celebrating May Day in the region is anticipated and established, the manner of celebrating can vary wildly. In 2012, Seattle saw thousands of people take to the streets for May Day, while some protesters damaged corporate banks, businesses, and courthouses causing thousands of dollars in damage. Later that year, an FBI and grand jury investigation regarding a “conspiracy to destroy government property” and “interstate travel with intent to riot,” resulted in the imprisonment of four people, including three Evergreen students. The issue stirred controversy in the media and caution in activist communities, but May Day celebrations in the Pacific Northwest continue to take place every year While different cities have different levels of p...